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  • The Franklin Trees
    The Franklin Trees
    by Jonathan Nauman

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    The Franklin Trees
    by Jonathan Nauman

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Wednesday
Oct102012

Comments and Discussion

Disturbing. As all good literature is. The novel disturbs the reader in such a way that one rereads pages and chapters over and over trying to make the characters and events fit into one's own conventional expectations of the mystery genre, and one cannot.

In the tradition of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Jonathan Nauman has woven characters into a story that crosses planes of realities, and the reader is willingly drawn forward without realizing that he has left one for another.

The final chapter, "The Envoi," describes the separation of two former friends, Jim Canby and Alan Prince who, together experienced the same phenomenon as elementary school chums, but who choose to deal with it in opposite ways now that they are older.. The newcomer to the school, Nick, must decide between the two ways of understanding reality. Is the world quantifiable and therefore controllable, or is it a mystery that we are called to explore?

February 28, 2011 | Dan Liporto

 

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I would echo the above comment particularly regarding the claim that this book is "in the tradition of Nathaniel Hawthorne". Yes! This book provokes that same mystery that recalls one to other places, other dimensions. Not simply in the material world but also in the spiritual. In the reading, one experiences (as Jim Canby does) a transcendence that transports one to considerations that are other-worldly. This is a special thing.

March 1, 2011 | William Stevenson (williamdwriter@yahoo.com)